Skip Navigation Links


Highland Road Park Observatory

NOVEMBER 2022

Friday 4 November

7:30 pm to 8:30 pm:   Operation Freshman   BREC Program Aide James DeOliveira recounts an important incident at the long-forgotten Norwegian front of World War Two. A Nazi nuclear weapons program was on course for destruction, but the British were intent on stopping it! [No admission fee. For ages fourteen and older.]
8:30 pm to 10:00 pm:   Evening Sky Viewing   Weather permitting, viewing through one or more telescopes will take place. During this time the waxing gibbous Moon will be at a maximum altitude of 56°. Please keep headlights off while parking and leaving, and drive slowly! [No admission fee. For all ages.]

Saturday 5 November

10:00 am to 12:00 pm:   Observing the Universe—Eyes   Cadets will discover the majestic objects that can be spied in a natural sky without any equipment. [For ages eight to twelve. $5.00 per in-parish Cadet; $6.00 per out-of-parish Cadet.]

Tuesday 8 November

2:00 am to 5:00 am:   Total Lunar Eclipse   Overnight excitement at HRPO as we open to witness one of nature’s most spectacular events! While in the constellation Aries♈, the Moon will enter the Earth♁’s shadow, turning darker and darker—and then??? The actual color can range from dark brown to red to bright orange to yellow, depending on the current state of the Earth♁’s atmosphere. Don’t miss it!
7:45 pm to 9:45 pm:   Uranian Opposition   Uranus♅ is exactly 180 degrees from the Sun☉, rising as the Sun☉ is setting. We are now the closest we’ll be to Uranus♅ this year! The light-blue, high-ice planet is very compelling. Although rather small due to its distance, its enormous size and unique color allow one to distinguish it from the stars in the constellation Aries♈.

Friday 11 November

4:45 pm to 6:45 pm:   The Edge of Night   It’s not light, it’s not dark. It’s that special time called twilight, and HRPO wants to introduce you to it! Are all sections of the sky the same shade of blue? Which stars are seen first? Are Mercury☿ and Venus♀ or the Moon out? Is that moving object a plane, a satellite or space debris? There is no other time like twilight. Bring it into your life! [No admission fee. For all ages.]

Saturday 12 November

10:00 am to 12:00 pm:   Observing the Universe—Equipment   Many “secret” clusters, nebulae and galaxies are undercovered with binoculars. Cadets will learn how to do it! [For ages eight to twelve. $5.00 per in-parish Cadet; $6.00 per out-of-parish Cadet.]
12:00 pm to 2:00 pm:   Solar Viewing   Weather permitting, safe viewing of the Sun☉ in three different manners will occur. During this time the Sun☉ will be in the constellation Libra♎ at a maximum altitude of 42°. [No admission fee. For all ages.]
7:00 pm to 10:00 pm:   Evening Sky Viewing   Weather permitting, viewing through one or more telescopes will take place. During this time the waning gibbous Moon will be at a maximum altitude of 17°. Please keep headlights off while parking and leaving, and drive slowly! [No admission fee. For all ages.]

Monday 14 November

6:00 pm to 7:00 pm:   Light Pollution Committee Meeting   BRASopen house is for all skygazers, taxpayers, homeowners, business owners, teachers and other stakeholders in a natural-contrast night sky. This month members will discuss with the public the Seven-Year Action Plan and how to perform GLOBE at Night measurements. [No admission fee. For ages eighteen and older.]
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm:   Baton Rouge Astronomical Society Meeting   For forty years BRAS has educated countless numbers of citizens in the joys of planetary and deep-sky gazing, the perils of light pollution and factors to consider when buying a pair of binoculars or a telescope. Over the years BRAS members have published in “Astronomy,” “Sky & Telescope,” and “Scientific American;” constructed their own telescopes and photographic platforms; been interviewed by local media and the National Geographic Society; and entered robotics competitions, imaged comets, earned observing certificates and discovered asteroids. Anyone interested in learning more about BRAS is invited to attend. [No admission fee. For ages fourteen and older.]

Saturday 19 November

4:00 pm to 12:00 am:   HRPO 25th Anniversary   The first public night was in 1997. Several asteroid discoveries, public nights, camps, Science Academy awards, STEM-based activities and games, eclipses, transits, occultations and conjunctions later HRPO personnel are planning to serve the public for twenty-five more years! [No admission fee. For ages eight and older.]

Monday 21 November and
Tuesday 22 November

8:00 am to 5:00 pm:   Fall Space Exploration Camp   Cadets will build and launch a chemical rocket, learn about the Artemis and Juno missions, receive updates on the asteroid Apophis and learn how to see the next bright comet and big meteor shower! [For ages nine to thirteen. $55.00 per in-parish Explorer; $66.00 per out-of-parish Explorer. Limit twelve.]

Saturday 26 November

3:30 pm to 7:30 pm:   STEM Expansion: “Mars Mania”   This program offers advanced topics, topic extensions and all-new games and activities to an older crowd. Certificates will be earned, and a section of archived experiments (some never performed on site) take place. [For ages twelve to sixteen. $15.00 per in-parish registration; $18.00 per out-of-parish registration. Limit twelve.]
7:30 pm to 10:00 pm:   Evening Sky Viewing   Weather permitting, viewing through one or more telescopes will take place. During this time the waxing crescent Moon will be at a maximum altitude of 3°. Please keep headlights off while parking and leaving, and drive slowly! [No admission fee. For all ages.]

Please also check the HRPO front page or the BRAS Forum for special celestial events or live broadcasts that could not be confirmed for this page’s publication time.


Updated by Frederick J. Barnett on Monday, October 31, 2022, 02:22 PM.

Back to top